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April 25 2017

hijabby:

jointphotographicexportsgroup:

redhead8295:

this is the sweetest thing my eyes have ever seen😱😭💕

like. please watch this video of sir patrick stewart adopting a pitbull 

😢 oh my god this is adorable

lewisandquark:

disexplications:

Video game titles created by a neural network trained on 146,000 games:

  • Conquestress (1981, Data East) (Arcade)
  • Deep Golf (1985, Siny Computer Entertainment) (MS-DOS)
  • Brain Robot Slam (1984, Gremlin Graphics) (Apple IIe)
  • King of Death 2: The Search of the Dog Space (2010, Capcom;Br�derbund Studios) (Windows)
  • Babble Imperium (1984, Paradox Interactive) (ZX Spectrum)
  • High Episode 2: Ghost Band (1984, Melbourne Team) (Apple IIe)
  • Spork Demo (?, ?) (VIC-20)
  • Alien Pro Baseball (1989, Square Enix) (Arcade)
  • Black Mario (1983, Softsice) (Linux/Unix)
  • Jort: The Shorching (1991, Destomat) (NES)
  • Battle for the Art of the Coast (1997, Jaleco) (GBC)
  • Soccer Dragon (1987, Ange Software) (Amstrad CPC)
  • Mutant Tycoon (2000, Konami) (GBC)
  • Bishoujo no Manager (2003, author) (Linux/Unix)
  • Macross Army (Defenders Ball House 2: League Alien) (1991, Bandai) (NES)
  • The Lost of the Sand Trades 2000 (1990, Sega) (SNES)
  • Pal Defense (1987, author) (Mac)

(part one, part two)

Spork Demo is either really innocuous or really violent.

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April 24 2017

pilferingapples:

marauders4evr:

See, the problem with people who aren’t in wheelchairs writing about and/or drawing people who are in (manual) wheelchairs is that the people who aren’t in wheelchairs tend to think that there’s only like four movements that you do in a wheelchair. You can either push forward, push backwards, turn left, or turn right. And the characters do it all while sitting up straight or bending forward so that their noses touch their knees.

But the amount of motions that I go through on a daily basis are actually amazing. And the body language…you could write an entire book on the body language of someone in a wheelchair.

Like right now, I’m more relaxed, so I’m slouching slightly. I’ve got my right foot on its footrest and the left foot on the ground. Every so often, as I stop to think of something to say, I’ll push with my left foot to rock the chair slightly.

But usually, I sit mostly upright with my upper-half slightly leaned forward. When I’m wheeling across the campus, especially if I have somewhere that I need to be, I’ll lean and shift my weight in whichever direction it is that I’m going. It helps make the wheelchair glide that much more smoothly. How far/dramatically I lean depends on how fast I’m going, the terrain, if there’s a turn, etc.

Plus people who don’t use wheelchairs don’t understand the relationship between grabbing the wheels, pushing, and the chair moving. Like I’ve seen things written or have seen people try to use a chair where the character/that person grabs the wheel every single second and never lets go to save their lives. Which isn’t right. The key is to do long, strong, pushes that allow you to move several feet before repeating. I can usually get about ten feet in before I have to push again. It’s kind of like riding a scooter. You don’t always need to push. You push, then ride, then push, then ride, etc.

And because of this, despite what many people think, people in wheelchairs can actually multitask. I’ve carried Starbucks drinks across the campus without spilling a single drop. Because it’s possible to wheel one-handed (despite what most people think), especially when you shift your weight. And if I need to alternate between pushing both wheels, I’ll just swap hands during the ‘glide’ time.

I’ve also noticed that people who don’t use wheelchairs, for some reason, have no idea how to turn a wheelchair. It’s the funniest thing. Like I see it written or, again, have seen people ‘try’ a wheelchair where they’re reaching across their bodies to try to grab one wheel and push or they try to push both wheels at the same time and don’t understand. (For the record, you pull back a wheel and push a wheel. The direction that you’re going is the side that you pull back.)

Back to body language. Again, no idea why most people think that we always sit upright and nothing else. Maybe when I’m in meetings or other formal settings, but most of the time, I do slightly slouch/lean. As for the hands…A lot of writers put the wheelchair user’s hands on the armrests but the truth is, most armrests sit too far back to actually put your hands on. There are times when I’ll put my elbows on the edges of the armrests and will put my hands between my legs. Note: Not on my lap. That’s another thing that writers do but putting your hands in your lap is actually not a natural thing to do when you’re in a wheelchair, due to the angle that you’re sitting and the armrests. Most of the time, I’ll just sort of let my arms loosely fall on either side of the chair, so that my hands are next to my wheels but not grabbing them. That’s another form of body language. I’ve talked to a few people who have done it and I do it myself. If I’m ever anxious or in a situation where I want to leave for one reason or another, I will usually grip my handrims - one hand near the front , one hand near the back. And if I’m really nervous, you’ll find me leaning further and further into the chair, running my hands along the handrims.

Also, on a related subject - a character’s legs should usually be at 90 degree angles, the cushion should come to about their knees, and the armrests should come to about their elbows. You can always tell that an actor is not a wheelchair user when their wheelchair isn’t designed to their dimensions. (Their knees are usually inches away from the seats and are up at an angle, the armrests are too high, etc.) Plus they don’t know how to drive the chair.

Let’s see, what else? Only certain bags can go on the back of the chair without scraping against the wheels, so, no, your teenagers in wheelchairs can’t put their big, stylish, purses on the back. We don’t always use gloves since most gloves actually aren’t that helpful (as stated above, wheeling is a very fluid motion and gloves tend to constrict movements). Height differences are always a thing to remember. If you’re going for the “oh no, my wheelchair is broken” trope, nobody really has ‘flat’ tires anymore thanks to the new material for the wheels but it is possible to have things break off. We use the environment a lot. I always push off of walls or grab onto corners or kick off of the floor etc. Wheelchair parkour should really become a thing. 

This is all of the physical things to think about. I could write a thesis on the emotional treatment of your characters with disabilities. But for now, I think that I’ll stop here. For my followers in wheelchairs, is there anything that I left out?

Also why isn’t wheelchair parkour a thing? Somebody make wheelchair parkour a thing.

This is all REALLY GOOD and I wish something like this would be in more art guidebooks and classes. 

One thing I’d add is that some of the posture stuff here is specific to wheelchair users who have the right chair; a lot of people (hi, past me) have to use chairs that aren’t at all the correct size, and that’s going to change posture, ease of use, etc.  That’s such a broad variable that it’s probably useless to try and cover here, but it’s something to be aware of and research if it seems relevant to a character. 

radprotag:

imagine one day, someone tells you that a playing card loves you, literally, and you need to love it back. they keep repeating this. you are an adult. you are a ceo of a company. you make billions. you keep getting phone calls from people telling you to love your poker deck. you try to block all of their numbers but they keep coming back. they also want you to participate in magic rituals and visit fortune tellers. also your brother was just kidnapped. this is the life of seto kaiba

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deltheor:

So it’s gonna be forever/Or it’s gonna go down in flames
You can tell me when it’s over/If the high was worth the pain

I have feelings about this garbage ship, okay? @heroicmeep

April 23 2017

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ramenuzumaki:

so cute 😻😹(x)

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ochibrochi:

((+ bonus panel that didn’t make the final cut))

Children are wild

heythisisbecky:

Today one of my students threw a stuffed animal across the room and it landed directly in a plate filled with paint

And I had it narrowed down to a few kids but no one would confess so I made them all put their toys away and have five minutes of quiet time to Reflect on Their Behavior

During that five minutes of relative silence, this group of three year olds INVENTED A NEW CLASSMATE, named him, and unanimously blamed him for throwing the toy across the room

There was not a single weak link, they were all ride or die

Unreal

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gears2gnomes:

Sigh…

How to show expression with the mouth!

elviras-teckningar:

This was a request and at first I wasn’t sure if I had anything to provide with, but as it turn out it got a little longer than I expected because there were actually things I had to say!! Wow!! 

Anyway, this is some guidelines I follow when I try to make the face expressfull, more specifically the mouth! It is often neglected, since it’s actually pretty hard, I’ll admit. But I’m here to help (hopefully…)! A mouth expression tutorial as per request. Enjoy and hopefully it will help some a little. ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ

Draw the teeth at the right angle. 

This is super important. The upper jaw follows the angle of the head, and the lower jaw will depend on how open it is. Make sure you have a rough estimate of where the teeth are, and how much of them you’re going to see!

The lips will VERY roughly follow the same angle as the teeth. It really depends on the character, but it gives you a sense at least. 


If you DON’T do this, you’re going to lose so much volume and the mouth is going to end up looking unrelatable. I showed this example in this tutorial:


It’s not just the lips! 

The cheeks, chin, and tongue play a role too! 

Try look at your own mouth or references! I have a very pliable and large mouth, so that’s one reason why my characters have it too lmao.

ASYMMETRYYYYY (ง ͠° ͟ل͜ ͡°)ง

I cannot emphasize how important asymmetry is when drawing expressions. It applies not only to the eyebrows to achieve the Dreamwork Face™, but also the mouth. Seriously if you draw a symmetric mouth I will deliver myself to your mailbox and then shout at you until you fix it. 

Look at the difference between these two for example: which one has more “life”? 

I think you get the idea.

Push and squish - give it flow

Here’s an old drawing I have but it illustrates how I think when I squish the mouth, and use folding and wrinkles to my advantage.

Look at your own face and see where skin bundles up, where it creases the most and when bumps appear on your chin. Subtle details makes all the difference! 

One VERY effective detail is illustrated in the first sketch, where I pull upwards on one side, and downwards on the other. That’s a good detail to use when the character is making a skewed expression, or is extremely frustrated. I encourage you to play around with that concept bc it’s ~super effective~!

EXAMPLES:

Happy: Your entire mouth is pushed upwards, not just the corners of your mouth!

I tend to draw a :3 mouth bc I’ve been drawing Lance too much….. You don’t have to but it’s basically imprinted in my motor memory by now. 

Pouting/frowning: corners are pushed down, middle pushed slightly up. Sometimes, there’s a slight dip in the middle too. It can give a sense that the character is biting their lips.

Showing frustration/intimidating/is intimidated: basically showing a lot of teeth. The corners are as open as possible and the middle sorta more squished. An extremely important detail here is showing some of the gums, and open space between the cheeks and teeth. That way it looks like the mouth it open to it’s full potential. Here is also where you basically MUST add folds and bumps, or else it’s not going to look relatable. 

(Here I am again with the pulling upwards on one side and downwards on the other, as illustrated on the last sketch)

And then again, here’s just another doodle showing how important it is to show the gums. It’s the same face twice, but the second one looks slightly more frustrated doesn’t it?

(from my other tutorial on how to draw facial expressions)

As you can see, this last one is very versatile and I draw it a lot. Play around with the basic shape and see how much subtle details makes a lot of difference! 

That’s it! 

I hope that cleared some things up and was somewhat helpful! Enjoy drawing ✨

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tolrone:

1 Gil-galad

2 Glorfindel

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wherearetheynowjam:

They were your babies– you loved them and cherished them. You drew headshots of them facing left in the margins of your school notes. You drew comics about them, RPed with them, made playlists dedicated to them.

It’s been a while. Years, probably. You’re older and wiser now. It’s time to dust off your old original characters and draw them again. Redesign them or just redraw them; whatever suits your fancy. Draw something that would make your younger self turn on capslock.

This is an art jam, focused on shameless self-indulgence, joyful creation and shining a spotlight on your growth as an artist. Anyone can participate! If you’re interested, please reblog so that more people can see and join in.

The official blog is wherearetheynowjam. Follow it to see reblogs from the jam tag. The blog will be active during June. Follow and submit your works there. This art jam is organized by @doodlemancy.

asahisheadband:

pinchserveprince:

pemsylvania:

dudesinsnoods:

pemsylvania:

i love halloween i looked out my window and a kid dabbed at me

I love Halloween (5)
I looked out my window and (7)
A kid dabbed at me (5)

holy fuck its a haiku

It even has a season indicator. We can stretch that the narrator observed nature to reach a transcendent moment. It really is a haiku

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scotchtapeofficial:

sharkbutt-groove:

suppermariobroth:

Official art of Mario’s head without any facial features, found in the activity section of the Nintendo of Japan website. The site invites the viewers to fill in Mario’s face themselves.

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ianime0:

Yugioh Dark Side of Dimensions | Atem Summons Palladium Oracle Mahad

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April 22 2017

grecianangel:

mental illness does not give you a free pass to control people, no one no matter how good a lover or a friend is, they are not obligated to be there 24/7 for you, thats not how life works, people are allowed to have other friends and be with other people besides you, yeah it hurt sometimes but thats life, if you’re jealous of every single person you friend/lover is with that’s not you that’s not healthy, people leave sometimes and you have to except that, no matter how much you love someone it does not give you the option for them be only yours, they are people not property

clockworkpriest:

also like 10-15 years from now I hope someone makes one of those inspirational sports movies except it’s a 50 year old woman who wants to play competitive online games and everyone tells her she can’t because she’s too old, her reflexes are too slow, etc, and she gets this grizzled trainer except they’re a 19 year old kid who had a promising career until carpal tunnel syndrome ruined their chances of becoming the world champion so they train her and she fuckin wins, the end. movie of the year.

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